Prof. Alan Russell

Dr. Alan Russell (PhD in Biological Chemistry, 1987, Imperial College of Science and Technology, University of London) is a Distinguished University Professor of Surgery and the Founding Director of the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh. Further, he holds positions as Professor in the departments of Bioengineering, Chemical Engineering and Rehabilitation Science and Technology. In addition to his appointments at the University, Dr. Russell is the Executive Director of the Pittsburgh Tissue Engineering Initiative, Inc., as well as a consultant for UPMC's International and Commercial Services Division. He has founded three biotechnology companies; ICX Agentase LLC, NanoSembly LLC, and O2Cyte LLC, and was also the Founding President of the 3,000-member Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine International Society.

For the last 15 years, the Russell laboratory has been discovering what can be achieved by exploiting the rich interface of chemistry, biology and materials. Dr. Russell's work has impacted fields as diverse as chemical and polymer synthesis to tissue engineering and homeland defense. Dr. Russell has pioneered how to make polymers from enzymes and how to incorporate enzymes into bulk polymers. In a series of discoveries Dr. Russell's laboratory has found how to meld the synthetic and biological worlds.

Within the scientific community, Dr. Russell has participated on 24 advisory boards. Since the outset of his career, he has received numerous prestigious awards for his contributions to research, teaching and public service. These awards include R&D 100 Award – 2000 (R&D Magazine), three Carnegie Science Center Awards for Excellence – 2000 to 2006, sixteen consecutive appearances in Who's Who in Science and Engineering – 1992 through present, the Gilbreth lectureship from the National Academy of Engineering – 2004, and the Cockroft Rutherford lectureship from the University of Manchester – 2007, the Outstanding Alumnus Award from the University of Manchester – 2008, #32 in Rolling Stone's "Top 100 People who will change America" – 2009, and the American Chemical Society's Pittsburgh Award – 2010.

To date, Dr. Russell has contributed significantly to the interface between the fields of chemistry, biology, and material science. He has given more than 250 national and international invited lectures. Dr. Russell has published 138 articles in refereed journals, one book, and 10 book chapters and holds 14 patents, with 23 additional pending patents.

TEDA

In the fight against disease, defect and injury, Alan Russell has a novel argument:

Why not engineer new tissue and organs to replace sick ones?

 

 

Why you should listen to him:

 

 

Alan Russell is a professor of surgery -- and of chemical engineering. In crossing the two fields, he is expanding our palette of treatments for disease, injury and congenital defects. We can treat symptoms, he says, or we can replace our damaged parts with bioengineered tissue. As he puts it: "If newts can regenerate a lost limb, why can't we?"

The founding director of the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, at the University of Pittsburgh, Russell leads an ambitious biomedicine program that explores tissue engineering, stem cell research, biosurgery and artificial and biohybrid organs. They've also started testing a new kind of heart pump, figured out that Botox can help with enlarged prostate, and identified human adipose cells as having the possibility to repair skeletal muscle. In his own Russell Lab, his team has studied antimicrobial surfaces and helping to develop a therapy to reduce scarring on muscle after injury. Lately, his lab is involved in biotechnology studies in relation to chemical and biological weapons defense.

 

"Russell's own research, a blend of biotech and chemical engineering, is directed at finding ways to put biological molecules into everyday materials."

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

http://www.ted.com/speakers/alan_russell.html

ここ数年の幹細胞の世界の技術開発の成長は、目を見張るようなスピード感がありました。

このアラン・ラッセルのTEDのスピーチで話されている細胞シート技術は、当時は、世界一になる可能性を秘めていました。しかし、実際には、その後、多数の優れた細胞シートが開発されました。その中で、マウスなどの動物由来細胞は姿をひそめ、やはり自己細胞や人由来細胞の必要性が話されました。自己細胞は、患者の年齢や細胞内の幹細胞の数や、また、培養に日数がかかるため、緊急性のある疾患には使用ができません。その為、いつでも使用可能な状態の細胞シートの開発が待たれました。

 

当社の細胞シートは、人由来細胞のみを使用しています。

事故細胞ではなく、誕生したばかりの赤ちゃんの細胞を使用しているため、細胞内の幹細胞の数は、膨大です。

その膨大な数の幹細胞を使用するため、患者自身の細胞を使用した自己細胞シートとは、比べものにならないほどの効果をもたらします。そして、同時に、患者自身の細胞ではないため、緊急時に患者の細胞を採取し培養するなどの手間や時間がかかりません。緊急時に使用したいときは、いつでもどこでも使用が可能なのです。

まるで、バンドエイドのようにです。

ですから、救急車などや災害地などへの携帯も可能です。

兵士が危険な地帯へ携帯することも可能です。

当社の細胞シートは、まさに未来の治療方法・未来のバンドエイドと言っても良いかもしれません。

傷があれば、シートを張ることにより、スピーディーな修復が可能です。

 

現段階では、糖尿病の壊疽や褥瘡などの治療や難治性の皮膚病の治療に用いられています。

 

美容面では、当社では、自己細胞と他家細胞でのコスメ(美容液など)の製品が完成しています。

肌荒れやニキビ跡や皺やフェースリフティング用のコスメです。

 

自己細胞では、自身の若いころの細胞を凍結保存し、いつでも使用したいときに、取り出し解凍させ、コスメを作ることが可能です。

 

Selected recent publications

Alan Russell is a professor of surgery -- and of chemical engineering. In crossing the two fields, he is expanding our palette of treatments for disease, injury and congenital defects. We can treat symptoms, he says, or we can replace our damaged parts with bioengineered tissue. As he puts it: "If newts can regenerate a lost limb, why can't we?"

The founding director of the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, at the University of Pittsburgh, Russell leads an ambitious biomedicine program that explores tissue engineering, stem cell research, biosurgery and artificial and biohybrid organs. They've also started testing a new kind of heart pump, figured out that Botox can help with enlarged prostate, and identified human adipose cells as having the possibility to repair skeletal muscle. In his own Russell Lab, his team has studied antimicrobial surfaces and helping to develop a therapy to reduce scarring on muscle after injury. Lately, his lab is involved in biotechnology studies in relation to chemical and biological weapons defense.

He's also co-founder of Agentase, a company that makes an enzyme-based detector for chemical warfare agents.

"Russell's own research, a blend of biotech and chemical engineering, is directed at finding ways to put biological molecules into everyday materials."

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette